Categories
Family health General Sports Performance

Are You Magnesium Deficient?

Common symptoms of mild-to-moderate magnesium deficiency include anxiety, depression, fatigue, insomnia, irritability, panic attacks, muscle cramps and twitches, chest tightness, hyperventilation, faintness, difficulty with mental concentration, memory loss, confusion, nuchal pain, headaches, intestinal complaints, tremor, palpitations, and certain types of cardiac arrhythmias.

Magnesium is a cofactor for more than 300 different enzymes. It is essential for the synthesis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the body’s main storage form of energy.  Magnesium inhibits platelet aggregation, promotes dilation of blood vessels, and has an antispasmodic effect on skeletal and smooth muscle.1

I mostly use magnesium for its ability to help muscles relax.  It does this by binding to the calcium binding sites in the muscle and replacing the contraction-signaling calcium with magnesium, leading to muscle relaxation.2

Magnesium supplementation can come from oral supplements or epsom salt baths.  Usually 100-750mg/day is used. At the upper range it’s best to divide dosage throughout the day to help avoid diarrhea which is the primary symptom of excess magnesium. The formula I most frequently recommend includes potassium and some other vitamins that aid in potassium absorption, which is especially helpful after a workout.

1. Nutritional Medicine by Alan Gaby M.D.

2. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7286246

Wishing you wellness,

Michael Dunbar

Categories
Family health General Orthopedic rehabilitation Sports Performance

Risk Factors for Shoulder Stiffness

“Shoulder stiffness (SS) is a condition of restricted glenohumeral range of motion (ROM), which can arise spontaneously (primary or idiopathic SS, also known as “frozen shoulder”) or as consequence of a known cause, including surgical procedures on the shoulder (secondary and postoperative SS). Numerous risk factors have been described, both for primary and postoperative SS.

Recent research suggests that numerous clinical conditions have been related to the development of SS. These include, but are not limited to hormonal diseases and endocrine disorders (diabetes mellitus, hyperthyroidsm, hypothyrodism), neurological conditions (Parkinson’s), dupuytren’s disease, psychological factors (depression, anxiety), hypercholesterolemia, inflammatory lipoproteinemias and certain medications (protease inhibitors, MMPs inhibitors).

When addressing shoulder pain, it is imperative that other factors are considered. Make sure your healthcare practitioner is taking everything into consideration when deciding how best to treat your shoulder stiffness and pain.

Risk Factors for Shoulder Stiffness: Current Concepts

Shoulder stiffness (SS) is a condition of restricted glenohumeral range of motion (ROM), which can arise spontaneously (primary or idiopathic SS, also known as “frozen shoulder”) or as consequence of a known cause, including surgical procedures on the shoulder (secondary and postoperative SS). Numerous risk factors have been described, both for primary and postoperative SS.

Wishing you wellness,

Mary Clark

Categories
Orthopedic rehabilitation Sports Performance

It’s Time For East to Meet West in Sports Medicine

It is time for the current Sports Medicine model to incorporate a time tested medicine into the mix. A seamlessly integrated approach between traditional western and eastern medicines provides a synergistic approach, which provides a superior model for enhancing human performance, preventing injuries and rehabilitating from them as well. Here is an article I wrote:

 

It’s Time For East To Meet West In Sports Medicine

 

It’s Time For East to Meet West in Sports Medicine