Categories
Emotional health-Finding peace Family health General

Is Grounding/Earthing Beneficial To Your Health?

A study from the National Institutes of Health showed that “grounding” or “earthing” might actually have a beneficial impact on health. The study states: “Emerging evidence shows that contact with the Earth—whether being outside barefoot or indoors connected to grounded conductive systems—may be a simple, natural, and yet profoundly effective environmental strategy against chronic stress, ANS dysfunction, inflammation, pain, poor sleep, disturbed HRV, hypercoagulable blood, and many common health disorders, including cardiovascular disease. The research done to date supports the concept that grounding or earthing the human body may be an essential element in the health equation along with sunshine, clean air and water, nutritious food, and physical activity.”

And here’s where the news gets even better. Treatment is free. Literally all you need to do is sit or stand barefoot on the ground outdoors. Hug a tree. Do some snow angels in the grass. Really, anything that puts your body into physical contact with planet earth and nature can be good for your health.

So now that the weather is starting to cool, it’s the perfect time to head to the great outdoors (or even just your yard) for a little relaxation and grounding.

Earthing: Health Implications of Reconnecting the Human Body to the Earth’s Surface Electrons

Environmental medicine generally addresses environmental factors with a negative impact on human health. However, emerging scientific research has revealed a surprisingly positive and overlooked environmental factor on health: direct physical contact with the vast supply of electrons on the surface of the Earth. Modern lifestyle separates humans from such contact.

Categories
Family health General Orthopedic rehabilitation

Static Posture Linked To Pain

“Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without neck-shoulder pain.”
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Research published on July 25, 2019 found that individuals with neck and shoulder pain exhibited longer uninterrupted periods of muscle activation compared to their non-symptomatic counterparts. This suggests that static posture and not poor posture may be the greater concern and contributor to pain. The research reiterates the importance of taking regular breaks when sitting in front of a computer screen. 

Massage and acupuncture can help keep you functional, but studies like this show just how important it is for you to avoid being sedentary for too long.

Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without neck-shoulder pain

Aimed to compare muscle activation during computer use in those with and without pain. * Exposure variation analysis (EVA) applied to upper trapezius muscle activation. * EVA group differences and day-to-day reliability among controls determined. * Most EVA measures exhibited moderate-high reliability. * Pain group had more longer continuous durations of muscle activity than controls.

https://sciencedirect.com

Wishing you wellness,

Mary Clark