Categories
Family health General Orthopedic rehabilitation

Static Posture Linked To Pain

“Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without neck-shoulder pain.”
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Research published on July 25, 2019 found that individuals with neck and shoulder pain exhibited longer uninterrupted periods of muscle activation compared to their non-symptomatic counterparts. This suggests that static posture and not poor posture may be the greater concern and contributor to pain. The research reiterates the importance of taking regular breaks when sitting in front of a computer screen. 

Massage and acupuncture can help keep you functional, but studies like this show just how important it is for you to avoid being sedentary for too long.

Trapezius muscle activity variation during computer work performed by individuals with and without neck-shoulder pain

Aimed to compare muscle activation during computer use in those with and without pain. * Exposure variation analysis (EVA) applied to upper trapezius muscle activation. * EVA group differences and day-to-day reliability among controls determined. * Most EVA measures exhibited moderate-high reliability. * Pain group had more longer continuous durations of muscle activity than controls.

https://sciencedirect.com

Wishing you wellness,

Mary Clark

Categories
Emotional health-Finding peace Family health General

Angina and Acupuncture

A recent study published in JAMA, the Journal of the American Medical Association (July 29, 2019) reported that adjunctive acupuncture reduced angina frequency and pain intensity in those suffering from chronic stable angina (CSA). It was found to be more effective than antianginal therapy alone. Acupuncture treatment also resulted in better regulation of anxiety and depression within the treatment period. 
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The findings of the current study reported that the benefit is the result of acupuncture causing “autonomic remodeling by improving the balance between the vagus nerve and sympathetic nervous system during treatment.”
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All participants in the study received 12 sessions of acupuncture treatment (3 times a week for 4 weeks). The acupoints needled were PC6 and HT5.

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/2739058?fbclid=IwAR0ml1RxA5rA0dY2osoC_doukQCkr5dOhLfrsyXp9zwkkDPZoW3cepLZuGM

Yours in wellness,

Mary Clark

Categories
Emotional health-Finding peace Family health General

A Simple Life

“The world can be such a noisy place. Loud, haranguing voices lecturing me to hustle, to improve, build, strive, yearn, acquire, compete, and grasp for more. For bigger and better. Sacrifice sleep for productivity. Strive for excellence. Go big or go home. Have a huge impact in the world. Make your life count.

What if all I want is a small, slow, simple life? What if I am most happy in the space of in between? Where calm lives. What if I am mediocre and choose to be at peace with that?”

I believe that there is a welcoming peace in what the author refers to as “mediocre”, but l like to refer to as simple, extraordinary, slow, graceful and the fabulously freeing good enough. 

Undoubtedly there is also an excitement in the race to achievement, in being driven, being the best you can be and wanting more. 

Both options can bring you joy at different times of your life. In my opinion it is all about maintaining a balance. 

What if All I Want is a Mediocre Life?

What if all I want is a small, slow, simple life? What if I am most happy in the space of in between? Where calm lives. What if I am mediocre and choose to be at peace with that? Photo courtesy of Erin Loechner The world is such a noisy place.

This is another useful read. 

Simple Living Tips for the Stressed Out or Recovering Perfectionist

Simple living tips for the stressed out or recovering perfectionist. Fewer “shoulds” and more freedom; less hustle, more curiosity; less jumping through hoops and more putting my feet up to read; less stress, more purposeful action; doing the work I love imperfectly and joyfully.

Wishing you wellness,

Mary Clark